View of Tucson

Connecting people through a passion for environment

Being Arizona's only land-grant university means that our connection to the community is deeper than just the land we occupy. The University of Arizona has a commitment to supporting, collaborating and working with the vibrant communities that make up Southern Arizona, especially when it comes to the stewardship of our environment. 

Whether you're a community member, an educator, or are just looking to get involved, explore ways to interact with the many environmental units at the University of Arizona.

Are we missing something important? Let us know

 

Attend our Events

The university hosts many environmental and educational events for the community and larger public.
Join us next time!

See our calendar

A UA student and a volunteer supervisor volunteering near campus

Community Outreach

The University of Arizona connects with the community through outreach and partnerships that educate community members about and promote sustainable agriculture and gardening, water and watershed conservation and restoration, and more.

Large group of students listening to student leadership explain the directions at a environmental volunteering event

Resources for the Community

The University of Arizona serves as a vast resource of public information on a variety of topics, focusing on education of earth and environmental sciences, farming and ranching in Arizona, climate and its impacts, wildfire management, renewable energy, phenology and much more.

2 UA students using gardening tools at a volunteering event

Citizen Science

The University of Arizona and its research partners value the involvement and dedication of community members in contributing to scientific knowledge. Citizen scientists work in collaboration with scientists and researchers on a variety of projects to help researchers more quickly and efficiently address societal and environmental needs, accelerate science and innovation, and improve understanding of the natural world.

From GreenFeed

Guide to the Arizona monsoon: Dust storms, lightning and safety tips for first-timers

You breezed through your first winter — we know, 75 degrees and sunny in January was tough — but you did it. You really liked spring, when you were able to get outside, and even though it's starting to get a little toasty now you're thinking you can handle summer. Because, really, how much hotter can it get?

Plant-Based Thanksgiving

Happy Turkey Week, Wildcats! It’s no secret that as populations and incomes increase around the world, agriculture and other food systems have been working hard to feed the world’s people. However, some food industries (specifically meat processing industries) have huge carbon footprints and emit carbon into the atmosphere at alarming rates. In fact, In fact, Diana Liverman, director of the School of Geography & Development, states that "people think about controlling greenhouse gas emissions, they usually think of fossil use, like having fewer coal-powered plants, or driving more fuel-efficient cars, but not many realize that the food system contributes to greenhouse gas emissions". Because pressure has been put on the United States and other countries to halve greenhouse gas emissions by 2030, these food production practices must change -- and we can start this week!

Some tropical forests show surprising resilience as temperatures rise

Scientists are finding that some percentage of tropical forests may hold up under global warming—if they’re not cut down.