Until further notice, the University of Arizona, in accordance with the guidelines recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, encourages all employees to work remotely. Our offices and rooms in the ENR2 building are closed to the public, but you can reach us, Monday through Friday from 9 AM to 5 PM, at (520) 626-4345 or by email to mmheard@arizona.edu.

 

FIND YOUR PERFECT ENVIRONMENT AT
THE UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA

See our themes

Snow on saguaro cactus in desert

Explore the Arizona Institutes for Resilience: Solutions for the Environment and Society (AIR),
a unit under the Office of Research, Innovation & Impact

Learn About Us

Changing the world starts at home. Join us as we chart the course towards creating a more vibrant, sustainable planet.

The environmental issues we face today demand to be met with a combination of discovery and drive. With dozens of environment-related degrees and clubs to choose from, the University of Arizona can set you on a path of real-world, hands-on experience that will prepare you for a future of work that makes an impact.

By connecting some of the world’s leading educators and researchers with students and community members, Arizona Environment is working to confront the unique environmental challenges of the 21st century.

Students

From clubs and committees to courses and degrees, there are myriad ways for students to get involved with environmental issues at UArizona.

Learn more

 

Researchers

Find funding opportunities and help us continue to break new ground in studies related to the environment and sustainability.

Learn more

 

Community

Discover how UArizona is teaming up with organizations across the region to make an impact in fields ranging from renewable energy to wildfire management.

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About AIR

Harnessing the university’s collaborative expertise, the Arizona Institutes for Resilience links knowledge and know-how with real-world issues to help us create a more sustainable future.

Learn more

 

Feeling Blue? Go Green!

With about 350 days of sunshine a year and a vast learning laboratory of desert, sky islands, cities, and even a nearby sea, the University of Arizona offers infinite opportunities for research, education, and engagement with the surrounding environment. Discover all the ways you can get involved, from majors and minors to clubs and activities.

Explore our Green Guides

From Greenfeed

A Q&A with Ida Sami

Ida Sami, Ph.D. Candidate at the University of Arizona, shares her research focus, challenges, and impact in a Q&A for the NCSE Conference 2021.

Some Ecological Damage from Trump’s Rushed Border Wall Could Be Repaired

Conservationists urge Biden to dismantle it quickly, especially in key habitats

Arizona mining industry steps up to meet skyrocketing demand for copper

It has the highest recycling rate of any engineering metal, every child born today will use about 1,500 pounds of it, between 500 and 600 pounds of it were used to make billions of doorknobs in the United States, and the Statue of Liberty is plated with upwards of 179,000 pounds of it.

Scientists applaud President Biden’s White House science team and commitment to science

President Joe Biden’s White House science team faces cascading crises as it takes command amid COVID-19, escalating climate change and crippling public doubts about science. But scientists across the country are confident the new administration is up to the challenge, especially under the leadership of science adviser Eric Lander, the pioneer who helped map the human genome.

Analysis of Alaskan Tree Rings can Help Fine-Tune Future Climate Predictions

University of Arizona researchers read between the lines of tree rings to reconstruct exactly what happened in Alaska the year that the Laki Volcano erupted half a world away in Iceland. What they learned can help fine-tune future climate predictions.

Testing for SARS-CoV-2 in Wastewater

The University of Arizona began monitoring campus wastewater for evidence of SARS-CoV-2 in March of 2020. That August, a sample from one of their 20 on-campus dorms revealed a viral load—an indication that individuals living in that residence might be infected.1 The school tested each of the 311 residents in that dorm and found two positive cases—neither was yet exhibiting symptoms, suggesting they could have passed the virus silently throughout the student population had they not been found in time. Instead, they were isolated before they could infect others, and the school averted a wider outbreak.

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