Until further notice, the University of Arizona, in accordance with the guidelines recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, encourages all employees to work remotely. Our offices and rooms in the ENR2 building are closed to the public, but you can reach us, Monday through Friday from 9 AM to 5 PM, at (520) 626-4345 or by email to mmheard@arizona.edu.

 

FIND YOUR PERFECT ENVIRONMENT AT
THE UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA

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Snow on saguaro cactus in desert

Explore the Arizona Institutes for Resilience: Solutions for the Environment and Society (AIR),
a unit under the Office of Research, Innovation & Impact

Learn About Us

Changing the world starts at home. Join us as we chart the course towards creating a more vibrant, sustainable planet.

The environmental issues we face today demand to be met with a combination of discovery and drive. With dozens of environment-related degrees and clubs to choose from, the University of Arizona can set you on a path of real-world, hands-on experience that will prepare you for a future of work that makes an impact.

By connecting some of the world’s leading educators and researchers with students and community members, Arizona Environment is working to confront the unique environmental challenges of the 21st century.

Students

From clubs and committees to courses and degrees, there are myriad ways for students to get involved with environmental issues at UArizona.

Learn more

 

Researchers

Find funding opportunities and help us continue to break new ground in studies related to the environment and sustainability.

Learn more

 

Community

Discover how UArizona is teaming up with organizations across the region to make an impact in fields ranging from renewable energy to wildfire management.

Learn more

 

About AIR

Harnessing the university’s collaborative expertise, the Arizona Institutes for Resilience links knowledge and know-how with real-world issues to help us create a more sustainable future.

Learn more

 

Feeling Blue? Go Green!

With about 350 days of sunshine a year and a vast learning laboratory of desert, sky islands, cities, and even a nearby sea, the University of Arizona offers infinite opportunities for research, education, and engagement with the surrounding environment. Discover all the ways you can get involved, from majors and minors to clubs and activities.

Explore our Green Guides

From Greenfeed

Guide to the Arizona monsoon: Dust storms, lightning and safety tips for first-timers

You breezed through your first winter — we know, 75 degrees and sunny in January was tough — but you did it. You really liked spring, when you were able to get outside, and even though it's starting to get a little toasty now you're thinking you can handle summer. Because, really, how much hotter can it get?

Plant-Based Thanksgiving

Happy Turkey Week, Wildcats! It’s no secret that as populations and incomes increase around the world, agriculture and other food systems have been working hard to feed the world’s people. However, some food industries (specifically meat processing industries) have huge carbon footprints and emit carbon into the atmosphere at alarming rates. In fact, In fact, Diana Liverman, director of the School of Geography & Development, states that "people think about controlling greenhouse gas emissions, they usually think of fossil use, like having fewer coal-powered plants, or driving more fuel-efficient cars, but not many realize that the food system contributes to greenhouse gas emissions". Because pressure has been put on the United States and other countries to halve greenhouse gas emissions by 2030, these food production practices must change -- and we can start this week!

Some tropical forests show surprising resilience as temperatures rise

Scientists are finding that some percentage of tropical forests may hold up under global warming—if they’re not cut down.
 

UArizona could shut down Tumamoc Hill again if mask use doesn’t increase

The University of Arizona could close Tumamoc Hill to hikers if more people don't start wearing masks.

Two Companies See a Golden Opportunity in the Tijuana River's Brown Waters

Two competing forces – one from the United States and another from Mexico – are rethinking the region’s oldest and dirtiest problem, imagining it instead as a moneymaking opportunity.

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