News and Events

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Whether in international news or an on-campus presentation, our nearly 300 faculty affiliates and in-house researchers are sharing their work, discussing the boundless effects their environmental endeavors have on Arizona, the U.S., and the world.

Recent News

Southwest Climate Outlook January 2018

January 17, 2018

<p>December precipitation ranged from average to much-below average across most of Arizona, with record-dry conditions along the western edge of Arizona. Above-average temperatures and below-normal precipitation are reflected in the expanding areas of drought designation in the Jan. 17 U.S. Drought Monito, with Arizona documenting increases in extent and intensity of drought since the December outlook.</p>

December 2017 SW Climate Podcast

December 21, 2017

<p>In this episode of the CLIMAS Southwest Climate Podcast, Mike Crimmins and Zack Guido discuss the regional temperature and precip of the past 30-90 days, including the mostly above average temperatures, the very dry conditions, and the recent precipitation event that hit parts of southern Arizona and New Mexico. They also discuss the California wildfires in the context of the Santa Ana winds, years of persistent drought, the convergence of conditions that set the stage for the current crisis in California, and La Niña.</p>

Southwest Climate Outlook December 2017

December 20, 2017

<p>November precipitation was below average across most of Arizona, with record-dry conditions in the western third of the state. Above-average temperatures and below-normal precipitation are reflected in the expanding areas of drought designation, with both Arizona and New Mexico seeing increases in extent and intensity of drought. The three-month outlook for January through March calls for increased chances of below-average precipitation for all of Arizona and New Mexico, and increased chances of above-average temperatures for the entire southwestern United States.</p>

Report Hails Tucson's Excellence in Food Diversity, Access

December 12, 2017

<p>A new report on the state of Tucson’s food system, produced by the UA Center for Regional Food Studies, shows that Tucson is one of the top U.S. cities in its high diversity of edible plants affordably accessed, grown and eaten as a means to reduce food insecurity.The new director of the Center for Regional Food Studies Megan Carney says, "Biodiversity is a matter of social justice. Without concerted efforts to preserve and cultivate biodiversity, our food system will be monopolized by private interests. At stake here is not only the health and resilience of our ecosystem, but that of our own population as well."</p>

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