Per capita energy usage is calculated for each hall. Values are plugged into a mock City of Tucson electricity bill and e-mailed students to raise awareness of their utility consumption.

Research Theme:
Energy, Science Engagement

An upcycling program that turns trash into reusable items. Residence Halls collect: candy wrappers, snack bags, energy bar wrappers, drink pouches, cookie packaging, and writing utensils

Research Theme:
Urban Environment

Every hall's Eco-Rep and ACT rep are required to collaboratively host a program that teaches the broader meaning of sustainability (people, planet, and profit).

Research Theme:
Science Engagement, Urban Environment

Residence Life's student sustainability advocacy group. They learn about sustainability and are then responsible for taking that knowledge back to their halls and teaching other residents.

Research Theme:
Science Engagement, Urban Environment

Living Environmentally Aware Dailt (LEAD) certification (1-4 stars) can be earned by completing/pledging to complete various sustainable tasks and education.

Research Theme:
Science Engagement

Eco-power is a web-based software to show potential electric usage and rates for dorms, apartments, and office buildings.

Research Theme:
Energy, Informatics, Modeling, and Remote Sensing

Residence Life partners with community based nonprofits to collect reusable items for charities across southern Arizona.

Research Theme:
Business and Economics, Urban Environment

The LSSA participates in local Farmer's Markets to reach out to other organizations and the Tucson Community. They currently share a tent with the CEASA (Controlled Environment Agriculture Student Association) selling house plants, native desert plants, and herbs. LSSA aims to expand to other Farmer's Markets around Tucson to network with other vendors and interact with the Tucson community.

Research Theme:
Food Systems and Security, Public Health, Urban Environment

The 1,600-square foot, 45-bed UA Community Garden is open to students, employees, and community members. Throughout the fall and winter of 2011, students dug plant beds, installed irrigation systems and built a shed for garden tools. The garden has been divided into 45 plots measuring 20 feet by 3 feet. Students, community and faculty can rent plots for a fee of up to $70 per year. As of March 2012, all of the faculty spaces have been reserved, and only a handful of student plots and community plots remain. Since 2010, a UA Community Garden Internship has connected UA student interns with local schools and teachers to grow, build, and maintain school and community gardens. Currently, 24 graduate and undergraduate students work at seven Pima County schools and three community gardens. Interns also work with the Tucson Community Food Bank, which trains interns to design and construct sustainable gardens, suitable for Tucson’s environmental conditions, and provides the participating schools with gardening resources. Iskashitaa and SFS/UA Community Garden agree to a partnership which will increase nutritional food security for families and individuals coming to the UA Campus Pantry. Additionally, it will prevent food waste from occurring at the UA Community Garden by diverting specified crops into the hands of Iskashitaa.

Research Theme:
Food Systems and Security, Natural Environment and Biodiversity, Science Engagement, Urban Environment

Compost Cats is an entirely student-run project to convert food and green waste from the University of Arizona and other local businesses into a valuable soil amendment, help reduce the carbon footprint of the university, and save the university money by reducing landfill fees. Compost will be donated to campus gardens and landscapes and to community and school garden projects in Tucson. In 2012, as the project continues to expand, compost will also be sold in bulk and in retail packages to generate revenue that helps to sustain the project financially. Monday through Friday, students collect compostable food waste from the Student Union Memorial Center and transport it to the compost site at the UA Agriculture Center. Students also collect compostable waste from 16 local businesses, including Whole Foods, Starbucks, and the University Marriott, as well as clippings from campus landscaping projects. In their first year, from January 2011 to February 2012, the Compost Cats have collected 414,000 pounds of green waste and 198,940 pounds of food waste. 

Research Theme:
Food Systems and Security, Public Health, Urban Environment

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For more information, please contact greenguides@email.arizona.edu.